By Jen Mannas, Naturalist

The end of April marks the start of baby raccoon season at PAWS.

When young raccoons first arrive at our wildlife center most are very small and their eyes are still closed. They are orphans who are too young to survive on their own and are still in need of care from mom.

Upon arrival each raccoon is examined by our rehabilitators. Those in need of medical attention are also examined by our veterinary team and treated for injuries or illness. Once they are deemed healthy they join their siblings in the nursery.

There are two raccoon nurseries at PAWS and they are both in full swing for the majority of the spring and into the summer. The young raccoons stay in the nurseries for a few weeks before being moved to an outside enclosure where they spend the remainder of their time with us.

The PAWS team cares for them with daily cleanings, feedings and by providing enrichment to stimulate their senses and their minds.

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Raccoons remain with us through the summer and into the early fall when they are old enough for release. With collaboration and help from local agencies, suitable release sites are located.

These sites are especially chosen for raccoons, with a body of water nearby, plenty of space for them to roam and away from humans and other hazards like highways.

This year our first raccoon release took place at the end of September and by mid-October all 41 of our summer raccoon patients had been released back into the wild.

It is quite a sight watching these raccoons explore their new environment for the first time. Their heightened sense of touch allows them to experience the world a lot differently than many other mammalian species. This is very apparent as they leave the safety of their release carriers.

Raccoon Babies Feel World For First Time from PAWS on Vimeo.

They take their time and touch everything and some things they are touching for the very first time. After a while they make their way deeper into the safety of the forest and you can see the vegetation move from side to side as they navigate their way into their new surroundings.

Make a donation and help us continue providing a safe haven for recovering wildlife at PAWS.

Found a wild animal? Find out what to do and how PAWS can help.


By Katherine Spink, PAWS Staff

This month we share the story of Ruka, whose adventure with Tracy and Andre began back in 2007 and has been non-stop ever since!  

What made you decide to adopt from a shelter versus purchase from a breeder?
Adopting from a shelter was an important one for us. It is heart breaking the reasons why so many people give up on their animals. With so many great animals, we knew there would be a match for us at a shelter.

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What was it that most attracted you to Ruka?
We didn’t know about Ruka going into the shelter. We talked to PAWS staff about what we were looking for. A dog who was game to go places; to work, on vacation, to the beach, to the park, out and about, anywhere and everywhere. I used to play a game – “If I Had A Dog” – and would imagine all the fun stuff we’d do together. PAWS staff said Ruka was our boy.

When Ruka got out into the play area, he started to prance! We would throw a toy and he would run up and stop it from moving, then prance around the play yard! When we went up to him, he leaned into the affection. He has a big personality. His intake papers said he was “friendly, but somewhat hyper”. All true.

Is Ruka any particular breed?
PAWS called him an Australian Shepherd mix. We genetically tested him. If you believe there’s weight to those tests, he came back as 100% dog and a mutt. 1/8 Beauceron, 1/8 Golden Retreiver, 1/8 Corgi, 1/8 Pug, 1/8 Irish Setter, 3/8 unknown. So not a breed, just a dog.

How was your adoption experience with PAWS?
PAWS was a great experience for us. The staff really knew their animals, and animal behavior. The notes we read and the conversations we had about Ruka really described him. We were prepared for the friendly hyper pup we were bringing home.

Tell us about your first journey home and how you settled in together.
We were so unprepared! Ruka didn’t have a bowl or a bed or any toys… we had no idea when you adopt a dog from a shelter they can be ready to go home that day! He had a hectic first few hours driving all around Seattle buying supplies.

By the time we got him home he was pretty nervous, and started to tip things over – his water bowl, plants… anything that could tip, he tipped it. We got him into manners class fairly quickly, we knew it would be really important for bonding. There was an adjustment period – we all had to learn to trust each other and get on the same page. To understand him and for him to understand us.

Share some of the highlights of life with Ruka.
Ruka has moved with us from Seattle to Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh to the Berkshires, back to Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh to Aspen, CO and now from Aspen to Vancouver, WA. He’s been to 29 of the contiguous United States and has swum in both oceans.

One of his most favorite activities is to eat. Anything. He will train for lettuce! He’s very food motivated which makes him easy to train. He also loves to play fetch. He didn’t use to like fetch. But sometime around age 4, he decided he loved it when we bought a Chuck It.

Can't see this video of Ruka playing fetch? Try watching it on YouTube.

We adopted Merlin, his dog sister, in 2011 from a shelter in Pennsylvania. She makes a great companion for fetch, reliably retrieving the ball while Ruka carries his around in his mouth and smashes it in his teeth.

We discovered Ruka could sing! And that his favorite song is Black Horse and a Cherry Tree by KT Tunstall. On the way home from the beach one Thanksgiving, probably a year or two after we adopted him, the song came on the radio and Ruka started to howl to the woo-hoos! It’s his jam.

How has Ruka changed your life?
Ruka makes everything a bit better: vacations, naps, coming home, and even the bad times. He has brought us to the present through his enthusiasm for training and life in general, and this has made both me and Andre more intentional, thoughtful and compassionate people. Ruka introduces us to people through his good natured friendliness and we’ve made friends in every neighborhood we’ve lived in. Both Andre and I are better people and more active because of Ruka.

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Any fun things you’re looking forward to?
We just moved and are settling back in the Northwest. Every Thanksgiving we go to the Oregon coast and spend days on the beach throwing the ball for the dogs. About half the vacations we take are actually dog focused and we’re looking forward to exploring new places with our canine companions.

What would you say to anyone who isn’t sure whether to adopt a shelter dog?
Shelter dogs aren’t used cars or clothes. They’re living things. They deserve second chances and forever homes.

Breeders don’t ensure you know what you’re getting. Every dog, like every individual child you have or friend you make, is different. You work on the relationship together, no matter the origin.

There are a ton of statistics on animals in shelters or rescues needing homes. You can even find purebred dogs. We get asked a lot of the time what kind of dogs our two rescues are… and we say your guess is as good as ours, but they’re 100% love! And they’re 100% dog!

Tracy and Andre, thank you for sharing such a wonderful update. We wish you another seven years filled with happiness and adventures!

If, like Tracy, you found your perfect match (or matches!) at PAWS, we want to hear about it. Email us to be featured in PAWS Where Are They Now.

Help care for our companion animals as they wait for their second chancevolunteer.

Find your Ruka todayadopt.

Donate now and help us continue providing a safe place for companion animals in need.


By Jen Mannas, Naturalist

Every evening in a small neighborhood in Clinton, Washington a pair of Great Horned Owls can be heard amongst the trees calling to each other. One evening recently, the male decided to pick a very unfortunate spot to eat his freshly caught mouse.

He landed on a transformer on top of a power pole. This caught the eye of a resident on her nightly walk. She watched the owl peck at his meal when suddenly there was a loud bang and a flash of light. The next thing she saw was the owl falling to the ground.

She rushed over to see if he was still alive and found him sitting upright and very stunned. Concerned that he had some serious injuries she scooped him up in a towel and brought him to PAWS the next morning.

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When the owl arrived at our Wildlife Hospital he didn’t have any obvious injuries but he was pale and dehydrated.

After the veterinarian team examined him they found that he had some bruising on his feet and possibly a detached retina. He was considered very lucky since there was no sign of an entry or exit point for the electrical charge he endured.

However, the main concern with this patient was how damaged his retina actually was and if he would be able to see well enough to hunt again. 

Eyesight as well as hearing are very important for owl survival. They must be able to hone in on their prey while hunting and accurately judge distance for striking.

Great Horned Owls primarily hunt from a perch at night and rely heavily on their eye sight to do so. They have extremely big eyes, even for an owl. Their pupils open widely and their retinas are predominately made of rods which help their eyes function effectively in low light.

The maximum effective hunting distance of a Great Horned Owl from an elevated perch is 300 feet. Pretty impressive don’t you think?

Luckily for this owl his eye injury was not serious. In just under 2 weeks he demonstrated to us that he was able to catch live prey, fly quietly and accurately, and was deemed ready for release.

We rode the evening ferry to Whidbey Island and returned him to the neighborhood he came from. Residents watched in excitement as he flew from his carrier and landed in a nearby tree where he called for his mate.

Make a donation and help us continue providing a safe haven for recovering wildlife at PAWS.

Found a wild animal? Find out what to do and how PAWS can help.

Worried about power lines putting birds in your area at risk? Read about the Snohomish County Avian Protection Program.


By Katherine Spink, PAWS Staff

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. When it comes to our adorable adoptables, it can mean the difference between a few days or a few months of patiently waiting for the perfect forever family to walk through our shelter door.

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In this month’s Volunteer Spotlight, we talk to Angie McMeins (pictured right, with Sadie). She's one of several talented Web Team photographers who kindly give their time and expertise to capturing that perfect moment for each and every PAWS adoptable.

What led you to get involved at PAWS?
I’ve always wanted to work in animal rescue but never had the time when I had to work full time to support myself, a mortgage and three pets. I worked in corporate advertising for years and it was unrewarding work that didn’t fulfill my creative needs. Now, I’m lucky to have a supportive husband and the opportunity for a “second chance” in life.

When I looked at the volunteer opportunities at PAWS and saw I could be a photographer, the decision was a no brainer. I’ve combined my education and life experience with two of my passions: photography and animals!

Tell us some of your favorite things about your role at PAWS.
I absolutely love working with the animals, they are why we’re here. Even if I’m not feeling my best, I can come in and get some 'fur therapy' and go home with a smile. Photographing rescue animals is the most challenging (and the most rewarding) thing I’ve ever done. I've also made some great friends, I always feel at home when I’m at PAWS.

Talk us through a typical shift.
I work with shelter staff to compile a list of animals that need to be photographed, and then off I go! We have many adopters who drive a long way to meet our animals based on the photos we post online, so our focus is to get the best possible photos of each animal and help someone fall in love with them.

What do you do when you’re not at PAWS?
Besides photography, my passion is scuba diving. Anyone who thinks taking topside (what we divers call 'land') photos is difficult should try shooting underwater loaded down with dive gear, paying attention to dive time and depth, while chasing down a constantly moving fish not remotely interested in posing! As for work, I started a pet sitting business several years ago. I’m also an avid reader, and I love to cook, garden and spend time outdoors, usually with a camera in hand!

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What are you hoping for when you come to take a photo of an animal available for adoption?
My hope is that my photos might help an animal get adopted more quickly. I hope for good lighting, a calm animal, dry ground (since I often lay down to get at eye level) and a place where I can shoot uninterrupted. However, hopes and reality often differ, so I just take it one animal at a time and try to get the best photos I can.

I want to minimize their stress, give them a break from the kennel, let them smell things and hopefully get a few good pictures. I know I’ve nailed a photo when I see it and my heart skips a beat. When that animal gets adopted quickly, it’s the best feeling in the world.

What are the specific challenges of photographing shelter companion animals?
Where do I start?! Besides bad weather and bad lighting, I’m dealing with confused, stressed animals who don’t understand why they’re in this strange, loud environment. They don’t know me, and a lot of them are scared of the camera.

I often try to spend time with them before I even try to take a picture; give them some treats, let them smell me, let them hear my voice, maybe give a scratch behind the ears if they’ll let me.

If I’m successful in winning their trust, then I start taking photos - hanging onto the leash with one hand and operating the camera with the other, all while figuring out how to get them to look at me, to stop licking the lens, to stop stealing hot dogs out of my treat bag, to stop trying to chase that squirrel! 

Take Jack (pictured right) for example. In typical beagle fashion, he was far more interested in treats than in being cooperative for the camera. Taking photos of him was a challenge as he was either in the process of barking or just finished barking with a funny look on his face. I finally did get a nice photo of his beautiful brown eyes and soft velvety ears.

Any funny moments to share?
My funniest PAWS moment actually involves kittens. I love going in the cat colony room at PAWS in Lynnwood since I can photograph several cats at once and get some kitty love at the same time. This particular day, I was trying to take photos of a cat that was more interested in smelling my shoes than looking at the camera, so I sat down on the floor to get a better angle.

All of the sudden, I feel a “thump” on my back. A kitten had jumped on me and was climbing up my back! As I was twisting to try to get the kitten, I felt a leg go down the back of my pants! So by this time, the first cat had stopped smelling my shoes and crawled in my lap, the climbing kitten had managed to crawl up my braid and was sitting on my head (memo to self, don’t wear long hair in a style that cats can climb!), and a third cat had its leg down my pants.

I just sat on the floor covered in cats and laughed until I cried. I’m really glad no one was around, I’m sure I would have ended up on YouTube!

As for taking good animal photos, here are Angie’s top tips:

Focus on the eyes: The eyes are the story, they show the animal's personality, their feelings, their soul. You don’t have to show the entire animal, focus on the essence of that animal and let their story speak for itself.

Get on their level: Don’t look down on them, lay down on the ground or the floor and see the world the way they do. Try some unique angles, maybe shooting below their nose or through a bush. This leads to much more interesting results.

Angie-and-Draco

Be patient: Photographing animals is challenging in any circumstance but animals in a shelter add a new dimension. Spend the time making them comfortable, have treats, love on them, let them walk around. I’ve spent an hour with one frightened hyperactive dog, and ended up getting fantastic photos. We are there to get the best photos we can, don’t rush the process.

What would you say to anyone interested in photography at PAWS?
Sign up for volunteer orientation now! We’re always looking for new talented people to join us. It doesn’t matter if you’re an amateur enthusiast or a pro, or what kind of equipment you use. All you need is a love for animals, a passion for photography and a heart of gold.

We also need handlers to assist our photographers in getting the animals out for photos, holding and positioning them, and giving treats or playing with the animal to get them to interact. Make a difference and join us in our mission of helping animals at PAWS find their forever homes.

Thanks for this fascinating insight into photography at PAWS Angie – we couldn’t do what we do without you and our wonderful Web Team!

Inspired by Angie? Become a PAWS volunteer today.
No spare time to volunteer? There's another way you can help us. Donate now.
October is National Adopt A Shelter Dog Month and we're celebrating! Check out our adoption special for adult dogs 7yrs+.


By Jen Mannas, Naturalist

It’s that time of year again here in Seattle. The leaves are changing, there's a chill in the air, it’s getting dark earlier each day and the skies are full of birds heading to their wintering grounds.

This spectacular event is known as the fall migration. As the summer breeding season ends and the temperature drops birds begin their journey to warmer areas with more abundant food.

Washington State is part of the Pacific Flyway, which is one of the four major flyways in North America. The Pacific Flyway stretches over 4,000 miles south from the North Slope of Alaska to Western Mexico and over 1,000 miles between the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Ocean.

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Birds use this flyway as a super highway to their wintering grounds and have been doing so for thousands of years. It's estimated that at least one billion birds use the Pacific Flyway each fall comprising of over 350 different species.

During this migration hundreds of thousands of birds fly through the Seattle area on their way south. Many use this area as a stopover and will leave again when the weather gets colder.

However not all migratory birds go south for the winter.

Many species of seabirds and shorebirds breed in inland areas and will actually travel west to the coast to spend their winters.

Other species such as owls, who spend their summers up in the mountains, come down to lower altitudes during the winter where there is more food.

Pictured: Green Herons (top L) and Barn Swallows (top R) migrate south while Horned Grebes (bottom L) and Greater Yellowlegs (bottom R) migrate to Puget Sound from the interior of Washington.

Here at PAWS Wildlife Center we receive many of these migratory birds throughout the year. Some of them come in as orphaned baby birds in the spring and others as full grown adults who are sick or injured.

As with all of our patients, PAWS staff and volunteers try to treat and return these migratory birds back to the wild quickly. Releasing them before their natural migration ends is extremely important so they may join others of their kind on this great journey.

Join us on the frontline of wildlife care and rehabilitation - volunteer at PAWS.

Make a donation and help us continue providing a safe haven for wildlife at PAWS.

Found a wild animal? Find out what to do and how PAWS can help.


By Jen Mannas, Naturalist

On June 30th we received a small surprise at the Wildlife Center; a fluffy baby barn owl.

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When he arrived he was small enough to fit in the palm of your hand, weighed just over 2 ounces, and his eyes were still closed.

The finder brought him to us after repeatedly trying to reunite him with his mother, who was sitting in a nest box made of steel beams 14 feet up in the top of a horse arena.

After the third fall from the nest, she decided to bring him to PAWS for help.

We typically try to reunite young raptors with their parents as quickly as possible, as it's always better for them to be raised by their parents. But, in some circumstances, this isn’t possible.

After talking to the finder about the nest site, it was clear that putting the owlet back again would not help his survival. The nest was not in a great location and another owlet had already fallen from the nest but did not survive.

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So, we decided to care for this owlet with the intention to release him back into the wild as a sub-adult.

Raising a baby raptor is no easy task. Staff members became his surrogate parents, feeding him several times a day.

He spent the first few weeks of his life in our bird nursery allowing us to monitor his progress and growth.

When he was feeding on his own and big enough to walk around, he was moved outside to his own enclosure.

His care and feeding was then the responsibility of our volunteers who wore a sheet when they entered his enclosure to keep him from becoming habituated.

Habituated animals become gradually used to situations they would normally steer away from. This type of behavior is dangerous for both humans and the animal.

If an animal becomes too used to people or depends on them for food they could become nuisances or dangerous to humans and in turn jeopardizing the animal itself.

It is very important that the animals at our Wildlife Center do not become habituated, so they can return to the wild and be active members of their population.

Our staff and volunteers did a great job with this little owl. He acted just like a wild barn owl should by showing threat displays and flying around when people entered his enclosure.

After 87 days in our care and weighing in at 1.2 pounds, he was deemed ready for release.

Just after sunset on September 25th, he was returned to an area near the horse arena where he hatched. When we left him he was perched in a small tree waiting to hunt under the shadow of night.

Watch his first few moments of freedom:

Follow us on Instagram for more great behind the scenes moments.

Join us on the frontline of wildlife care and rehabilitation - volunteer at PAWS.

Make a donation and help us continue providing a safe haven for wildlife at PAWS.

Found a wild animal? Find out what to do and how PAWS can help.

By Amy Webster, Community Education Coordinator

So long summer, hello fall!

Summer had an amazing finish with PAWSwalk on September 6, a spectacular, fun, sunny day filled with passionate animal lovers and dogs of every shape and size.

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Thank you again to the generous sponsors, dedicated walkers, volunteers and event goers who made this such a successful event and memorable day.

We also enjoyed seeing you at the Puget Sound Birdfest and the Monroe Swift Night Out. Both were wonderful celebrations for bird enthusiasts and nature lovers.

 

Our Service Learning Workshops continue to be a great way for youth to volunteer their time to help the animals at PAWS.

We’re also starting a club for teens and will be holding an information meeting for those interested in learning about PAWS and how they can make a difference for animals. 

Sign-up to learn more about all our youth volunteer opportunities.

With the start of the new school year, our educators will be delivering lessons of compassion and responsible care for animals in classrooms and the community.

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October will include visits to Picnic Point Elementary in Edmonds and South Shore K-8 in Seattle. 

Interested in having PAWS visit your child’s school? Here’s the complete list of presentations we offer.

We look forward to seeing you in your community soon!

Help educate others in animal welfare and humane education—volunteer.

Help us continue inspiring the humane educators of the future—make a donation to PAWS.

Keep up to date with all our event news—follow our Events blog.


By Katherine Spink, PAWS Staff

This week’s Adorable Adoptables arrived at PAWS around the same time, Helen as a stray and Winston as a transfer all the way from Palm Springs California! Now they’re both settled in (and Winston’s jet lag has worn off) it’s full steam ahead finding their forever families. 

As a temporary hangout, our colony lifestyle at PAWS Cat City suits most cats down to the ground. Lounging around in comfy beds, watching the world go by, being visited by lots of lovely humans offering cuddles, catnip and playtime… what could be better?! But for some, like Helen, it takes a little getting used to.

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Helen was found by a member of the public and brought to PAWS in late August. A beautiful girl, we knew she was approximately six years old but didn’t have much more to go on in terms of her history.

Like all new arrivals we quickly set to work getting to know Helen, with staff and volunteers spending one-on-one time with her every day.

It’s fast become apparent that, although a little shy in her new surroundings, Helen is a play fiend – our Cat Charmer wand toy being a particular favorite. In fact, it’s hard to get it back once she’s caught it!

Helen likes her humans to be respectful and let her decide when it’s time for pets, paws on legs or rubbing your shins being the usual cues. When she’s given the go ahead, talk sweet to her and she'll often soft blink and even roll over onto her side.

In just a few weeks of coaxing her out of her shell, we know Helen will make the perfect companion for someone who has the time to help her adjust to their home life and the patience to cuddle at her own pace while she adjusts. If you’re that person or you know someone that is, contact our Cat City adoption team and arrange to meet Helen today!

#12-Winston

Five year old Chihuahua mix Winston is an all-round champion companion in the making! Whether it’s curling up on the couch, hitting the trail, hanging out at the office or driving round town, he’s ready for any adventures you have in mind.

Rescued from an uncertain future in California, Winston arrived within days of Helen and quickly established himself as a staff favorite due to his unlimited capacity for cuddling.

He had some time out recently with foster mom Kara and, away from the kennel environment, proved himself to be a mellow well-mannered little guy – definitely a fan of the ladies and small dogs, though the jury’s still out on cats!

If you’re looking for a canine companion who’s already housetrained, is great on the leash, makes new friends easily and has lots of energy, Winston’s your man. Call us today at PAWS in Lynnwood, WA and arrange an adventure with him!

Meet all our current companions patiently waiting for forever homes.
Read about the adoption process at PAWS.
Found a pet? See how PAWS can help.
Help us continue providing a safe haven for companion animals in need. Donate now.


By Jen Mannas, Naturalist

We've received quite a few patients at the Wildlife Center this summer who've been injured by being struck by vehicles. One such case was a bald eagle brought to us back in July.

Since bald eagles are opportunistic foragers they take advantage of whatever prey species are available. In most regions of the country fish is their main source of food but they will prey on small mammals and birds.

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They're also scavengers who sometimes feed on carrion on the side of the road, making them susceptible to being hit by vehicles.

That is what landed this eagle in our wildlife hospital, the only wildlife rehabilitation center in Washington State equipped with immediate and continual veterinary expertise and services. 

He was found on the side of the road and brought to us at PAWS. He was mildly dehydrated, anemic, weak, and had a mild wing droop. But unlike other patients hit by vehicles, he did not have any broken bones.

Luckily for him this meant his road to recovery would not be as difficult.

He was kept in our ward under observation for four days, where he proved he could eat on his own, before moving outside to a small raptor enclosure.

As his anemia improved and he regained strength he was ready to move to our large flight pen. He spent the remainder of his time in the flight pen, flying between perches and gaining the strength he'd need to catch prey when he became wild once again.

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Well, his day finally came on September 12th when he was transported to the south side of Lake Sammamish and released with the help of the Washington State Parks Department.

After leaving his carrier he did a victory circle above our heads before flying off into the distance. Another inspiring and happy day in the life of PAWS Wildlife Center!

Join us on the frontline of wildlife care and rehabilitation - volunteer at PAWS.

Make a donation and help us continue providing a safe haven for wildlife at PAWS.

Found a wild animal? Find out what to do and how PAWS can help.


By Katherine Spink, PAWS Staff

Sweet seniors Eve and Columbo were transferred to us from other shelters in Washington State and are patiently hanging out at PAWS waiting to meet their forever families. They just need a little help getting the word out that they’re here and ready to go! How could we refuse?

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Ten year old Eve has been living the cat colony lifestyle at our Cat City location since April, when she was transferred to us from the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service (SCRAPS). This is a longer stay than most cats experience at PAWS, and a little surprising given her irresistible penchant for people snuggling.

Her relaxed, chilled out state (see in action, right) is infectious, which makes Eve the perfect antidote to a stressful work schedule – or the perfect partner to enjoy a laidback retirement with.

When Eve took a break from Cat City and headed off to spend a while with one of our fantastic foster caregivers, she adjusted immediately to her strange new environment and proved to be an exemplary house guest – mellow and well-mannered, a true lady.

If you’re looking for a feline friend who’s quiet (apart from a super cute, low volume meow) and well-versed in the indoor lifestyle, Eve’s the one for you. And, if you’re quick, you can adopt her while her fee is waived as part of our senior cat adoption special. Contact Cat City and arrange to meet Exceptional Eve today!

#11-Columbo

Like the TV detective he’s named after, Miniature Poodle Columbo is ready for his next case – finding a new forever home!

At first glance, you may think only having one eye could be a hindrance. Not for Columbo, it hasn’t affected his confidence or his zest for life in the slightest. In fact, just the other day he was playing with some of our other residents and approached them all with enthusiasm and excitement – accompanying every hello with a good sniff!

With his love of other dogs apparent, Columbo’s definitely the kind of guy that would enjoy having a four-legged buddy to spend time with. Do you have a suitable sidekick at home right now? If not, and you’re looking for a solo dog, playtime at an off-leash dog park or a dog-filled neighborhood will more than suffice!

When Columbo isn’t rooting around solving mysteries and making new friends, he’s a fan of the snuggles just like Eve. One of our volunteers commented that he climbed right into her lap and curled up when she went to visit him in his kennel.

Come visit this sweet older gentleman at PAWS in Lynnwood today and give him the cuddles and love he craves!

Meet all our current companions patiently waiting for forever homes.
Read about the adoption process at PAWS.
Can’t keep your pet? Find out how PAWS’ re-homing service can help.
Help us continue providing a safe haven for companion animals in need. Donate now.